spyware

Not Safe Anywhere: Jigsaw ransomware deletes more files the longer you delay paying

Not Safe Anywhere: Jigsaw ransomware deletes more files the longer you delay paying

Malware researchers have released a tool that can decrypt files affected by the new threat

Understanding how to buy bitcoins and pay ransomware authors for decryption keys is hard enough, yet some cybercriminals now expect their victims to do it in under an hour if they want all of their files back.

A new ransomware program dubbed Jigsaw encrypts users' files and then begins to progressively delete them until the victim pays the equivalent of $150 in Bitcoin cryptocurrency.

Fake Flash and Video Player Updates - User Beware

As scams and viruses continue to evolve faster than technology, it is harder than ever to protect our computers as carefully as we need to. If you have a popup that continues to show up asking you to update Adobe Flash Player or Java within an internet browser you have a virus. These pop-up ads are not actually created by Adobe, the developers of the Flash Player or Sun Microsystems, the architects of Java. They are in fact designed to spread adware and browser hijacks on the user’s computer.

This spyware, or in more seriously situations, Trojan, sends pop-up adverts on a regular basis. It makes your computer and internet run remarkably slower. And it magically produces a search bar or toolbar that normally was never there before.

So how do you recognize this virus before you are infected? To begin, make sure to read the fine print before clicking allow on the system download. Typically the infected pop-up will request you to down load a file named flash_player_updater.exe. Or requests to “Download Now” a file named update_flash_player.exe. This adware could as well be attached to recognizable small print on downloads. So in this case set up a firewall to protect your computer because this ad will most likely show up on low-quality sites. For example, sites where you can stream pirate videos.

If the pop-up still shows up, and you are not sure the pop-up is the real deal, turn off your computer. Do not click close or try to navigate around the pop-up. You may be inadvertently inviting the spyware to self-install.

Call your local technical support team so that they can help assist you in the process of removing the virus. They will take the appropriate measures to uninstall the program from the computer system and remove the virus extension from your internet browser. In addition, they can install the real version of Adobe Flash or Java by going to the direct website and doing a download.

Rethink Associates can save your computer at any hour of the day, any day. We are a perfect solution to your computer viruses issues and can help with future virus issues as well! Call today to get a free quote and protect your computer for the long run!

Google takes aim at Ad Injectors and their dangers

Do you sometimes see a bar on your computer screen with links to products that may or may not be related to what you are looking up online? If so, your computer may be infected with an ad injector. Computer repair experts are buzzing about Google’s recent study with the University of California Berkeley, which highlights initial findings about the latest Internet menace.

Advice from Springfield Computer Repair Specialists: What You Need to Know about Ad Injectors

Fast Facts about Ad Injectors

  • They can infect all operating systems, like Windows and Mac
  • Google found them in Firefox, Chrome and Internet Explorer
  • Over one-third of Google Chrome extensions had ad injectors with malware
  • Google disabled 192 deceptive Chrome extensions, which affected 14 million users
  • Google is using new techniques to scan Chrome extensions and extension updates to prevent the installation ad injectors

What are Ad Injectors?

Ad injectors are Internet extensions that popup when visit a webpage. Instead of seeing the ad that a website would normally display, if it displays them at all, you see ads that the creators of the ad injector wanted you to see. Some of the ad injectors are simply benign and annoying, while others contain malware.

According to Google, about 5 percent of individuals who visit a Google website have at least one ad injector installed in their computer.

How Did they Get on My Computer?

When you encounter an ad injector, it’s a sign that you have unwanted software in your computer. Sometimes, ad injectors are bundled with legitimate software, similar to Lenovo Superfish incident. Therefore, when you download something from the Internet or install a program, you may inadvertently install the ad injector program onto your computer. Experts at computer repair services state that other forms of ad injectors are malicious, deceptive and difficult to remove.

What You Can Do about Ad Injectors

  • When you see a popup stating that a program detected suspicious activity or that a site contains harmful programs, do not click on anything within the popup. Instead, click on the “back” button at the top of the browser screen or close the Web page. Immediately run a virus and malware scan.
  • Install a reputable popup blocker that works with your Web browser.
  • If you see an ad injector on the screen when you’re online, look for the name of the company that created it (but don’t click on anything within the ads). For example, you see this in the corner, “Ads powered by Mezaa.” Go to your computer’s Control Panel and click on the application that allows you to uninstall or change the programs on your computer. Look for the name of the ad company and uninstall the program.

If your antivirus software doesn’t detect the ad injector program, but you continue to see it, get in touch the Springfield computer repair experts at Rethink Associates as soon as possible. The sooner that you eradicate it, the better your chances are to not falling victim to the intruder. Contact Rethink Associates to learn more.


Browsing Security: Is that site safe?

The Internet is a vast wonderland of information, pictures, videos and so much more. However, browsing online is not without its traps and pitfalls. You have to be Web-geek to stay away from scammers, phishing attacks and hackers that want to steal your personal information.

One of the quickest ways to get in trouble is to hang out in the Internet equivalent of a bad neighbourhood. I’m talking about visiting sketchy websites. The trick is how to know a site is sketchy before you visit it.Don’t you wish there was some kind of “bouncer” that could keep you from getting into trouble on those sketchy sites? Luckily for you, there’s a browser add-on that can give you a head’s up when you come across a bad site.

That’s where Web of Trust comes in. It’s an add-on for Web browsers that shows you which sites are safe for browsing and what needs to be avoided.

 

Web of Trust, or WoT, has an easy scale of green to red icons to indicate which sites are trustworthy and which are unsafe. These icons will appear when you search for things online. Green is “safe,” yellow means “use caution” and red means “avoid at all costs!”. You can also see the WoT icon when you visit sites, and when you click on the icon you can see additional information. You can even rate sites based on trustworthiness and being appropriate for children.

Note: WoT will prompt you to create an account, but you don’t have to if you just want the site ratings. If you want to comment on WoT sites and participate in the WoT forums, however, you will need to create an account.

Download Instructions

Downloading the browser add-on is easy, just navigate to the Web of Trust homepage and click on the large green button labelled “Download” in the center of the page. It should have the logo of your browser on the button.The add-on download should begin immediately. When prompted, add the Web of Trust app to your browser. It’s just that simple, and completely free.

Once it’s installed, you can browse the Web with peace of mind knowing that you have a beacon to alert you when there’s trouble ahead.


Web of Trust, or WoT, has an easy scale of green to red icons to indicate which sites are trustworthy and which are unsafe. These icons will appear when you search for things online. Green is “safe,” yellow means “use caution” and red means “avoid at all costs!”. You can also see the WoT icon when you visit sites, and when you click on the icon you can see additional information. You can even rate sites based on trustworthiness and being appropriate for children.

Note: WoT will prompt you to create an account, but you don’t have to if you just want the site ratings. If you want to comment on WoT sites and participate in the WoT forums, however, you will need to create an account.

Download Instructions

Downloading the browser add-on is easy, just navigate to the Web of Trust homepage and click on the large green button labelled “Download” in the center of the page. It should have the logo of your browser on the button.The add-on download should begin immediately. When prompted, add the Web of Trust app to your browser. It’s just that simple, and completely free.

Once it’s installed, you can browse the Web with peace of mind knowing that you have a beacon to alert you when there’s trouble ahead.

CryptoWall Ransomware makes a resurgence...

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Cryptowall ransomware is on the rise again after a spam wave attempting to spread the virus was uncovered by the security experts at Bitdefender. 

Hackers were said to have sent out messages to potential victims in the UK, the US, Australia and other European countries, having located their servers around the globe to spread the malware, which encrypts a person's files before demanding payment for their release.

We have been warning about the dangers of ransomware for several years now. 

Catalin Cosoi, chief security strategist at Bitdefender, said: "Interestingly, in this instance hackers have resorted to a less fashionable yet highly effective trick to automatically execute malware on a victim's machine and encrypt its contents - malicious .chm attachments."

Chm files are compiled HTML documents often used to deliver instruction manuals for software, but are susceptible to mischief because of their ability to direct users to external URLs via JavaScript code.

"Attackers began exploiting .chm files to automatically run malicious payloads once the file is accessed," Cosoi said. "It makes perfect sense: the less user interaction, the greater the chances of infection."

The crooks behind Cryptowall are thought to be targeting company networks through fake fax reports that spoofs computers in the victims' domain to disguise the nature of the attack.

In the past those behind the virus have sought to spread the malware through malvertising, with the ransomware having overtaken CryptoLocker last September in terms of financial damage, according to Dell.

Since the destruction of infrastructure used to spread CryptoLocker and the associated trojan GameOver Zeus last summer, the Russo-Ukrainian gang behind the viruses is thought to havemoved on to other malware, including more sophisticated bits of ransomware like Cryptowall.